Frontier Former Editor

January 19, 2009

Like the two French diplomats reportedly said at Compiegne in May 1940 . . .

“A relief.”

“Yes, like crapping your pants.”

That should sum up George W. Bush’s departure tomorrow. I wouldn’t care if the inauguration was the Second Coming along with a burning bush, the parting of the Potomac, tastefully-done pillars of salt, Maccabees, Purim and Genesis (not with Phil Collins): George W. Bush has left this country with a vast landscape of scorched philosophical, spiritual and physical earth. In my darkest corner of my heart, I find more good in Richard Nixon’s evil persona than in Bush’s good old boy emptiness.

I hope Obama can start to bring the ship of state around to a calmer, more rational course, but it’s going to be awfully hard given what Bush and his puppeteers have left for us.

Not to mention what we allowed the stupid bastard to do and be conned into doing. Maybe he can stay locked in his now-gated community and start reading Tom Clancy as fact.

Please, George, please don’t let the door hit you in the ass Tuesday.

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May 18, 2008

It’s always enlightening to hear self-assessment

Thanks to The Hill’s Blog Briefing Room, via  Virginia Virtucon for this rather revealing document.

Just for background, Tom Davis is a Virginia Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Given that my Commonwealth now houses Republican luminaries such as Oliver North, Pat Robertson, Jim Gilmore and others, I’m sure that Davis’ little dissection is going over particularly well.

Especially when the Republican National Committee is so inclined to public self-denial. Yep, we’re winning the hell out of the war in Iraq and we’re going to achieve peace in our time in Palestine, yessiree!

Excerpt:

“The political atmosphere facing House Republicans this November is the worst since Watergate and is far more toxic than the fall of 2006 when we lost thirty seats (and our majority) and came within a couple of percentage points of losing another fifteen seats. Whether measured by polls, open seats, money, voter registration, generic ballot, Presidential popularity or issues, our party faces a steep climb to maintain our current numbers.

This slope is exacerbated by the fact that little has changed to improve our image over the past eighteen months and that voters looking for change are unlikely to embrace the same-old, same-old, which was overwhelmingly rejected in the last midterms. Members and pundits waiting for Democrats to fumble the ball, so that soft Republicans and Independents will snap back to the GOP, fail to understand the deep seeded (sic) antipathy toward the President, the war, gas prices, the economy, foreclosures and, in some areas, the underlying cultural differences that continue to brand our party.”

Really? You think?

There’s probably a strong clue in this document as to why Tom Davis chose not to run for the Republican nomination for Virginia’s open U.S. Senate seat: the Democrat candidate makes a better fiscally responsible, socially moderate Republican than any national Republican could hope to even dream of being.

But at least Tom Davis has a fair grasp of why Republicans in general are a pox upon the land – not that the Republican National Committee rank-and-file are going to listen.

Don’t think that, by implication, this post means that I wholeheartedly support the opposition. After wading through the pre-election festivities to date, I’d almost be willing to raise Nixon from the dead and vote for him.

Nixon might have been a paranoid, sociopathic, drunken, revanchist monster with fascist and John Bircher tendencies, but you could at least trust him to be those things and corner him like a rat to control those tendencies. Come to think of it, he was probably a better domestic-affairs and foreign policy president than just about every president in the 20th century with the possible exception of Roosevelt and Eisenhower.

Hell, even Nixon was willing to talk with our enemies because he could speak from a common base of experience, philosophy and complete lack of ethical grounding. Tyrants and subverters of democracy can appreciate threats and cajoling from other tyrants and subverters.

Not so with the greasy, amateurish pack of three trying to win our hearts and minds this year.

March 23, 2008

Sunday entertainment . . . .

One of the few things I miss about living in Northern Virginia 20 years ago (aside from the fantastic French bakery run by the Vietnamese couple just up the road from my apartment; being able to get Chinese food at 2 a.m.; two great family-owned hobby shops within less than a half-hour’s drive, and; riding the Metro) was getting a Washington Post on Sunday and spending the whole day wading through it. The crossword puzzle and the Post Magazine could take up half the day alone.

These days, I can still get a hard copy of the Post – three days late – but surfing and blogging are a fair substitute.

Something to share while I got do a crossword (online, since my local Sunday paper hasn’t made it here yet) is this little tidbit from Your Three Cents (via that radio babe who definitely doesn’t have a face for radio, Miss Cellania)

 And to be fair to our president (I still refuse to capitalize the title while that f**kwit’s in office), our own former governor Jim Gilmore showed his own continuing fiscal prudence in the news last week.

Who’da thunk that, after running Virginia’s transportation system into the ground and adding another $100 million annual burden to our state budget, that Gilmore would have been given a chance to preside over another good financial screwing?

(fom Associated Press, via Yahoo News)

RICHMOND, Va. – Former Gov. Jim Gilmore, who was criticized for his handling of state finances, was chairman of a Bear Stearns subsidiary set up to market some of its highest-risk securities tied to the home mortgage industry meltdown.

One money manager said Gilmore’s involvement in Everquest Financial Ltd. reflected his “naivete” in finance. Gilmore, a Republican, is now running for U.S. Senate.

Two troubled hedge funds managed by Bear Stearns owned a 60 percent share of Everquest when it was created in 2006. Everquest withdrew its bid for an initial public offering last June amid criticism of the hedge funds — which saw the mortgages underlying the bonds in some of their holdings fall sharply in value because of increased mortgage defaults.

I can’t wait to see the vote tally in our senatorial election.

Stilletto can appreciate this little side story. I got to watch one of the final public appearances of Jim Gilmore in our fine corner of Virginia before that idiot sailed off into hopefully permanent public oblivion. After presenting a big foam core check for some funding with which he had essentially noting to do with obtaining, Gilmore stood around for an hour in a chapel at what was then Clinch Valley College. He and his aides picked at the table of refreshments, half-heartedly nibbling at mini-muffins or cookies and drinking canned soda while waiting for the fog to lift so they could catch a plane out of town.

Several lawmakers who attended the event didn’t stay to talk with the governor – they beat it as soon as the presentation was over. After a few folks who just wanted to be able to say they shook hands with the governor did so, the chapel emptied in about 5 minutes.

Hemingway might have written; “His party stood alone. In the chapel. In the fog.”

I would have written; “What goes around comes around, with an extra 200 knots.”

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