Frontier Former Editor

March 17, 2009

Here’s another reason to major in history, or at least read it more than once every few years . . .

The Credit Mobilier scandal of 1872 – a good reason to hold big business’ s and elected government’s collective feet to the fire on a regular basis.

“Crédit Mobilier of America was formed by George Francis Train, the vice-president in charge of publicity for the Union Pacific Railroad. Crédit Mobilier of America was designed to limit the liability of stockholders and maximize profits from construction with the hefty fees being paid by federal subsidies. The company also gave cheap shares of stock to members of Congress who agreed to support additional funding  . . .

“It was claimed that the $72 million in contracts had been given to Crédit Mobilier for building a rail only worth $53 million. Union Pacific and other investors were left nearly bankrupt.”

Okay folks, and that was 57 years before the 1929 crash. Dubya, let’s go over the success of the “No Child Left Behind Act” again, shall we?

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March 15, 2009

Cry me a river, you neo-fascist turd

Dick Cheney is aggrieved because Dubya didn’t pardon his familiar:

“I was clearly not happy that we, in effect, left Scooter sort of hanging in the wind,” Cheney said in an interview on CNN’s “State of the Union with John King.” He acknowledged a “fundamental difference of opinion” with Bush on the matter.

A federal jury in Washington convicted Libby of lying and obstructing an investigation into who blew the cover of CIA officer Valerie Plame, whose husband, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson, had criticized the Iraq war.

Bush earlier commuted Libby’s 2-1/2-year prison sentence but before leaving office in January, Bush refused to give Libby an outright pardon.

Cheney said Libby had been unjustly accused and deserved a pardon but Bush disagreed. It was one of the few areas that Cheney has publicly said he disagreed with Bush on during their eight years in the White House.

I’ve made my opinion of Dick Cheney clear in this blog many a time – from his term as Secretary of Defense to the last eight years of a neo-fascist pall over this country. But now, I truly think he is this country’s Beria or Feliks Dzerzhinskiy, or even a low-rent Himmler.

Please, Cheney, find yourself a lair with some self-destructive mountain militia.

March 13, 2009

Where have you gone, Louis Rukeyser? Our nation holds its lonely eyes to you . .

If anyone ever questions or trivializes the role of satire and humor in society, they should remember this 10-minute segment.

Especially in a time where Citibank is hosting conference calls – on our tax dime – to encourage union-busting and who-knows-what-else.

What Stewart did is in the best tradition of Petroleum V. Nasby, Herblock, Samuel Clemens, Mort Sahl, George Carlin, Tom Lehrer and hosts of other humorists – ridicule, embarass, shame, humiliate and destroy anything that would prey upon society.

This society needs a huge sweep to remind ‘big business,’ ‘Wall Street,’ and every other over-dominant segment of the American business and political scene that acting like Charles Keating did in the  years leading up the the savings and loan scandals of the 1980s may not be child molestation but is just about as legally and morally defensible as being a child molester.

And while we’re at it on a bleak Friday afternoon, please allow Rush Limbaugh to continue broadcasting and expressing his opinion. Part of a free society is having the right to express one’s opinions and having the responsibility to defend the logic and rationality of those opinions.

And please allow Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele the right to express his political views for the same reason – even if he lacks the intellectual weight to generate rational policy and philosophical positions.

By the way – even Louis Rukeyser got caught violating federal trading rules, so be thankful, Jim Cramer. Be very, very thankful.

October 15, 2008

Everyone’s favorite ‘Salem’s Lot’ character that wasn’t included in the book

With all the hoopin’ and hollerin’ about our most favorite presidential election since, well . . . . since Nixon vs. McGovern, it’s all too easy to forget old friends like . . . .

 

 

Yep, Graf Cheney is having heart trouble again. After all, if you were nosferatu and faced having to move all those caskets of home earth after eight years . . . even with government allowances, it’s still hard to find Secret Service agents willing to ride the Borgo Pass this time of year.

 

And on other matters, I still wonder why no one has made a case for Sarah Palin being the reincarnation of Spiro T. Agnew. After all, she’s got Spiro’s winning way with selected and tamed groups of working folk (Philadelphia definitely didn’t fall in that category), and she’s got a gubernatorial pedegree much like that of Agnew’s.

 

Maybe if Cheney’s heart procedure is successful , he can help bring life to Palin’s national political aspirations. Eternal life . . . . .

April 17, 2008

Dracula’s soul brother

Filed under: blaxploitation, bloodsuckers, humor, old times, vampires — Tags: , , , , — Frontier Former Editor @ 1:20 pm

A little blaxploitation never hurt anyone, except fot the Bush administration’s use of Colin Powell and Condoleeza Rice.

So, before he was the King of Cartoons and after he damn near destroyed Star Fleet with an automated Enterprise, let me present William Marshall as undead soul brotha number ONE . . .

And in all three roles, Marshall showed ten times the presence of William Shatner and Pee Wee Herman.

October 24, 2007

‘Vampires, Guns and Money’

Filed under: American Bar Association, attorneys, bloodsuckers, cinema, horror, lawyers, movies, vampire castles, vampires — Frontier Former Editor @ 3:06 pm

I gotta give Miss Cellania her props – something I’ve failed to do in recent months.

Miss C has a link to a great list of the top vampire movies of all time over on her page, and I found myself going ‘yeah, uh-huh, right, good one, yep . . .’ reading down it. Go over and see how many you’ve seen.

Meanwhile, here’s some links to real-life vampire castles:

1

2

3

4

5

October 22, 2007

Vampires a-go-go, and the best vampire movie never made

Sunday was a vampire-themed day at the FFE household – we came into possession of free tickets to the Barter Theatre (it used to be Theater until some Yankee came on board as artistic director and tried to spiff up the image – wait, I’m part Yankee . . . .).

So, what did we see? It’s October, so why not see a Southwest Virginia-themed production of Dracula?

Without giving too much away, it was great entertainment if you were under 18 and mildly amusing if you were over 40. Guess where it stood on the FFE fun-o-meter? I think what gave me the case of the milds was the artistic director’s confusion on what he wanted the play to be. Was it a catchy little way to add that Appalachian flavor (if you’re a Yankee, then the third ‘a’ is pronounced long to show your arrogance and ignorance of local dialect), or was it the morality play and metaphor for sex in the post-AIDS era that the artistic director thought he might have meant in his playbill notes?

I’m betting that he wanted to show that he could capture Appalachian culture in a quick, marketable way he could toss out when tourists are coming through Southwest Virginia to see the leaves and find something else to do the rest of the day.

Hey, the tickets were free and I’m not a theater critic.

But to round out the day, we did pay (and full price, since Dracula ended after 5:30 p.m.) to see ’30 Days of Night.’ Without giving away too much, it’s based on a graphic novel (or high-falutin comic book) and throws some pretty decent little punches.

Short form – I didn’t mind paying full price for seeing it. If you’ve seen it, please feel free to say yay or nay here without trying to spoil the ending for at least the next three weeks – I will edit out any major plot spoilers that I catch during that three weeks.

And that leads me to the ‘best vampire movie never made’ part of the post title. Will Smith is coming out with ‘I am Legend’ in December. If you’re in my general age group, you know this movie is based on the Richard Matheson novella of the same name and has been filmed twice: ‘The Last Man on Earth’ with Vincent Price, and ‘The Omega Man’ with Charlton Heston.

Price’s version is the most fathful to Matheson’s book, but it’s kind of ‘eh.’ While Heston at least gets to schtupp Rosalind Cash, it too is ‘eh.’

If you dig around on Google, you can find a 1997 script treatment for ‘I am Legend’ that tracks pretty well with Matheson’s book. Whether it forms the basis of December’s release, we’ll see.

 I like depressing vampire movies.

July 16, 2007

She may have zombie hamsters, but we’ve got a bureaucratic solution!

Filed under: homeland security, immigration, mad science, politics, vampires, zombies — Frontier Former Editor @ 10:51 am

The same guys who gave us radar, the steam catapult and 2010 may be doing this . . . .

http://raincoaster.com/2007/07/16/zombie-hamsters-the-whores-of-lisle-street-the-lord-of-the-flies-and-global-warming/

 but we’ve got a bureaucratic solution with this:

 “Vampires arrived in the United States with the first European settlers and followed the general population shifts of Americans in the early days of the Republic. During this time, fighting vampires was a task left to individual bounty hunters and local militias known as the Vampire National Guard. As the country grew and became increasingly urbanized, a more ambitious vampire abatement program became necessary. The Copper Creek Seige of 1855, in which vampires took over an entire California mining town, underscored the country’s need for an organized, well-trained force to combat the growing plague. The Civil War delayed implementation until 1868, when President Ulysses S. Grant officially formed the Federal Vampire and Zombie Agency.

An early vampire patrol
is organized

Initially, the FVZA was a specialized branch of the Armed Forces, modeled after similar troops in France and Great Britain. The troops were known as the “Vanguard,” a contraction of Vampire National Guard. They worked mostly in large cities. By day, they scoured likely vampire/zombie hiding places; by night, they patrolled areas of high vampire/zombie activity (slums, waterfronts, parks, etc.). Though they were underfunded, ill-equipped and often shuttled off to fight wars on foreign soil, the FVZA made some strides in controlling resident vampire and zombie populations. However, the huge surges of immigrants coming to America helped increase the U.S. vampire population to 300,000 by the turn of the century.”

 And to think that the anti-immigration bill folks haven’t stumbled onto this yet.

Or maybe they have . . . .

May 18, 2007

My word, it’s all so clear now . . . .

Filed under: doomed to repeat, dumbasses, Heinrich Himmler, neofascism, politics, Satanic verses, scumbags, Third Reich, vampires — Frontier Former Editor @ 1:40 am

Guess where Alberto Gonzales is going?

March 29, 2007

Truly a shame I didn’t find this until now . . .

because it beats dogs playing poker as art any day of the week . . .

 (From artofmarkbryan.com via kchristieh’s blog)

The Mad Tea Party

And, after seeing this little piece of tomfoolery (see link below) from the radio and television press dinner Wednesday night, if I ever see NBC’s David Gregory in person I will spit in his face.

http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/i_video/main500251.shtml?id=2622366n

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