Frontier Former Editor

October 28, 2007

I suppose it is easy to get pissed . . .

when the kids are behaving exactly like the parents. Not that it really surprises me, but it does have its own chuckle factor:

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D8SI15C80&show_article=1

WASHINGTON (AP) – The homeland security chief on Saturday tore into his own employees for staging a phony news conference at the Federal Emergency Management Agency. “I think it was one of the dumbest and most inappropriate things I’ve seen since I’ve been in government,” Michael Chertoff said.“I have made unambiguously clear, in Anglo-Saxon prose, that it is not to ever happen again and there will be appropriate disciplinary action taken against those people who exhibited what I regard as extraordinarily poor judgment,” he added.”

Anglo-Saxon prose, eh? Fuck you Chertoff, you shitbag fuckwit goddamn Bush administration mouthpiece and douchebag. How’s that for unambiguously clear, Anglo-Saxon prose?

It doesn’t strike me as the dumbest and most inappropriate thing I’ve ever seen in government. After all, there’s:

  • – the actual FEMA and Homeland Security response to Hurricane Katrina
  • – the invasion of Iraq (and yes, it was an invasion)
  • – George W. Bush in general
  • – damn near anything Dick Cheney does on a daily basis, whether or not it’s classified.
  • – all those canned news spots issued by a private PR firm under a contract by the federal government on the Medicare drug benefit plan – the one with the fake reporter.

It just goes to show the real point Orwell made in 1984: totalianism in the future is the result of basically stupid, ignorant, know-nothing people that we allow to ooze into positions of responsibility.

August 30, 2007

No! It can’t be! (beware of dripping sarcasm)

Filed under: Iraq, journalism, not-so-free government stuff, public relations, scumbags, Texas contortionist — Frontier Former Editor @ 9:58 am

Little progress seen on Iraq goals  

By MATTHEW LEE, Associated Press Writer 2 hours, 47 minutes ago

“WASHINGTON – The Iraqi government has failed to meet the vast majority of political and military goals laid out by lawmakers to assess President Bush‘s Iraq war strategy, congressional auditors have determined.

The Associated Press has learned the Government Accountability Office, or GAO, will report that at least 13 of the 18 benchmarks to measure the surge of U.S. troops to Iraq are unfulfilled ahead of a Sept. 15 deadline. That’s when Bush is to give a detailed accounting of the situation eight months after he announced the policy, according to three officials familiar with the matter.

The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the report has not been made public, also said the administration is preparing a case to play down the findings, arguing that Congress ordered the GAO to use unfair, “all or nothing” standards when compiling the document.

The GAO is to give a classified briefing about its findings to lawmakers on Thursday. It is not yet clear when its unclassified report will be released but it is due Sept. 1 amid a series of assessments called for in January legislation that authorized Bush’s plan to send 30,000 more troops to Iraq, where there is now a total of more than 160,000 troops.

Among those Bush will hear from are the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Defense Secretary Robert Gates; the commander of U.S. forces in Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus; and the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, Ryan Crocker. The Pentagon said Wednesday Bush was likely to get a variety of views from different military officials. Bush will then deliver his own report to Congress by Sept. 15.

The GAO report comes at a pivotal time in the Iraq debate. So far, Republicans have mostly stood by Bush on the war and staved off Democratic demands of troop withdrawals. But in exchange for their support, many GOP members said they wanted to see substantial progress in Iraq by September or else they would call for a new strategy, including possibly a withdrawal of troops.” (read article here)

“the administration is preparing a case to play down the findings, arguing that Congress ordered the GAO to use unfair, “all or nothing” standards when compiling the document.”

Okay, if I remember correctly after years of public school, college, debate, logic, etc., isn’t a benchmark something you achieve or you don’t?

Ultimately, it’s all about leadership and not about PR . . . . .

Filed under: crime, dumbasses, guns, old college days, public relations, sociopathy, Virginia Tech, weapons — Frontier Former Editor @ 9:28 am

 Report of the Virginia Tech Review Panel

(Chapter VII, pp 79-82) 

PREMATURE CONCLUSION?

At this point, the police may have made an error in reaching a premature conclusion that their initial lead was a good one, or at least in conveying that impression to the Virginia Tech administration. While continuing their investigation, they did not take sufficient action to deal with what might happen if the initial lead proved false. They conveyed to the university Policy Group that they had a good lead and that the person of interest was probably not on campus.

(That is how the Policy Group understood it, according to its chair and other members who were interviewed by the panel and who presented information at one of its open hearings.)

After two people were shot dead, police needed to consider the possibility of a murderer loose on campus who did a double slaying for unknown reasons, even though a domestic disturbance was a likely possibility. The police did not urge the Policy Group to take precautions, as best can be understood from the panel’s interviews.

(more…)

August 27, 2007

What’s one attorney general forced from office in disgrace?

Too goddamned late and not enough.

But, hey, you take what you can get.

So, without further ado,  the annotated news guide to Alberto “Heirich Himmler” Gonzales (and a not-very-smart Himmler wannabe at that) . . . .

By MATT APUZZO, Associated Press Writer 7 minutes ago

WASHINGTON – Alberto Gonzales, the nation’s first Hispanic attorney general (and a much bigger-haired version of Heinrich Himmler, Harry Daugherty and John Mitchell), announced his resignation Monday, driven from office after a wrenching standoff with congressional critics over his honesty and competence (there was no standoff over his honesty and competence – everyone knew that he was a dissembling, unethical, gutless mouthpiece with an anus big enough to have Karl Rove’s and Dick Cheney’s hands inserted to operate his eyes, head and mouth).

Republicans and Democrats alike had demanded his departure over the botched handling of FBI terror investigations and the firings of U.S. attorneys, but President Bush had defiantly stood by his Texas friend (and clinically-defined toady) for months until accepting his resignation last Friday.

(more…)

July 8, 2007

Note to Department of Defense – don’t outsource PR either

Filed under: be all you can be, dumbasses, free govt. stuff, helicopters, public relations — Frontier Former Editor @ 9:09 pm

As if the U.S. Army doesn’t have enough public relations issues these days, I bring you the following snippet of a recent Army pop-up ad:

index_01.jpg

The helicopter hovering in the left of this banner – an Aerospatiale Gazelle – is not even in the U.S. Army’s front-line or support inventory unless there’s a test/evaluation example tucked away somewhere.

Unless, of course, someone at the Pentagon or at Halliburton surreptitiously switched the Army’s helicopter inventory with that of the French Army . . . .

July 3, 2007

It doesn’t surprise me, but it certainly disgusts me . . .

most of all because that fat, bald, arrhytmic neofascist Cheney got away with the real crime. 

Statement by the President On Executive Clemency for Lewis Libby

The United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit today rejected Lewis Libby’s request to remain free on bail while pursuing his appeals for the serious convictions of perjury and obstruction of justice. As a result, Mr. Libby will be required to turn himself over to the Bureau of Prisons to begin serving his prison sentence.

I have said throughout this process that it would not be appropriate to comment or intervene in this case until Mr. Libby’s appeals have been exhausted. But with the denial of bail being upheld and incarceration imminent, I believe it is now important to react to that decision.

From the very beginning of the investigation into the leaking of Valerie Plame’s name, I made it clear to the White House staff and anyone serving in my administration that I expected full cooperation with the Justice Department. Dozens of White House staff and administration officials dutifully cooperated.

After the investigation was under way, the Justice Department appointed United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois Patrick Fitzgerald as a Special Counsel in charge of the case. Mr. Fitzgerald is a highly qualified, professional prosecutor who carried out his responsibilities as charged.

This case has generated significant commentary and debate. Critics of the investigation have argued that a special counsel should not have been appointed, nor should the investigation have been pursued after the Justice Department learned who leaked Ms. Plame’s name to columnist Robert Novak. Furthermore, the critics point out that neither Mr. Libby nor anyone else has been charged with violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act or the Espionage Act, which were the original subjects of the investigation. Finally, critics say the punishment does not fit the crime: Mr. Libby was a first-time offender with years of exceptional public service and was handed a harsh sentence based in part on allegations never presented to the jury.

Others point out that a jury of citizens weighed all the evidence and listened to all the testimony and found Mr. Libby guilty of perjury and obstructing justice. They argue, correctly, that our entire system of justice relies on people telling the truth. And if a person does not tell the truth, particularly if he serves in government and holds the public trust, he must be held accountable. They say that had Mr. Libby only told the truth, he would have never been indicted in the first place.

Both critics and defenders of this investigation have made important points. I have made my own evaluation. In preparing for the decision I am announcing today, I have carefully weighed these arguments and the circumstances surrounding this case.

Mr. Libby was sentenced to thirty months of prison, two years of probation, and a $250,000 fine. In making the sentencing decision, the district court rejected the advice of the probation office, which recommended a lesser sentence and the consideration of factors that could have led to a sentence of home confinement or probation.

I respect the jury’s verdict. But I have concluded that the prison sentence given to Mr. Libby is excessive. Therefore, I am commuting the portion of Mr. Libby’s sentence that required him to spend thirty months in prison.

My decision to commute his prison sentence leaves in place a harsh punishment for Mr. Libby. The reputation he gained through his years of public service and professional work in the legal community is forever damaged. His wife and young children have also suffered immensely. He will remain on probation. The significant fines imposed by the judge will remain in effect. The consequences of his felony conviction on his former life as a lawyer, public servant, and private citizen will be long-lasting.

The Constitution gives the President the power of clemency to be used when he deems it to be warranted. It is my judgment that a commutation of the prison term in Mr. Libby’s case is an appropriate exercise of this power.

from the White House  

June 4, 2007

“Have you had a sexual encounter with a current member of the United States Congress or a high-ranking government official?”

Filed under: Come again?, free govt. stuff, lost weekend, obscenity, public relations, Satanic verses, scumbags — Frontier Former Editor @ 10:44 am

I knew my chance to get rich would come eventually!

Hustler offers $1 million for sex smut on Congress

“WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Hustler magazine is looking for some scandalous sex in Washington again — and willing to pay for it.

“Have you had a sexual encounter with a current member of the United States Congress or a high-ranking government official?” read a full-page advertisement taken out by Larry Flynt’s pornographic magazine in Sunday’s Washington Post.

It offered $1 million for documented evidence of illicit intimate relations with a congressman, senator or other prominent officeholder. A toll-free number and e-mail address were provided.

The last time Flynt made such an offer was in October 1998 during the drive to impeach President Bill Clinton over the Monica Lewinsky scandal.”

Dear Mr. Flynt,

 I have been repeatedly gangraped by all 435 535 members of Congress; the inhabitants of the White House, Naval Observatory and some remote secure location in Cheyenne Mountain, Wyoming; and the entire Justice Department. Of course, several million of my fellow Americans may be filing the same claim, so I got dibs!

May 27, 2007

Under the ‘ow, quit it . . . stop touching me!’ department

Filed under: fast food, food, food extenders, meat byproducts, public relations — Frontier Former Editor @ 1:03 pm

 Yeah, but at least we don’t roll our burgers around in e coli . . . . .

  

Jack in the Box Ads Called Misleading

Competitor Sues Jack in the Box Over TV Spots Mocking Burger Meat

The Associated Press

CKE Restaurants Inc. sued Jack In The Box in U.S. District Court on Friday over an ad in which executives laugh hysterically at the word “Angus” and another where the chain’s pingpong ball-headed mascot, Jack, is asked to point to a diagram of a cow and show where Angus meat comes from.

adsonar_placementId=1280488;adsonar_pid=43749;adsonar_ps=-1;adsonar_zw=165;adsonar_zh=220;adsonar_jv=’ads.adsonar.com’;

“I’d rather not,” the pointy-nosed Jack replies.

The employee asking the question traces a circle in the air with his pen while pronouncing the word Angus.

A little more here . . .

May 20, 2007

While shopping Saturday . . .

Filed under: medicine, obscenity, public relations, red, societal niceties, Walmart — Frontier Former Editor @ 4:03 pm

at the local ‘Megalomart,’ I saw a display for a product titled with three words that evoke an obscene, horrific image . . . . .

Metamucil Berry Blast

Some young ad exec type should be shot.

April 29, 2007

I was wondering when we’d finally have a Profumo affair . . .

Filed under: dumbasses, not-so-free government stuff, public relations, scumbags, Sex lies and 6 o'clock news — Frontier Former Editor @ 1:29 pm

given how this administration has been screwing the rest of the country (here)

Prostitution scandal has Washington in new ‘shock and awe’

Apr 28 04:17 PM US/Eastern AFP

The demise of a call-girl ring and pending trial of an alleged madam claiming thousands of clients has the US capital riveted by the chance powerful men may now be caught with their trousers down, with a senior state department official apparently first to fall. Deborah Jeane Palfrey, 50, dubbed the DC Madam in local media, has been arraigned in federal court on charges of operating a Washington prostitution service for 13 years until her retirement in 2006.Palfrey has denied she ran a prostitution ring. Her company, Pamela Martin and Associates, was simply a “high-end adult fantasy firm which offered legal sexual and erotic services across the spectrum of adult sexual behavior and did so without incident during its 13 year tenure,” she said.

Palfrey contends her escort service provided university educated women to engage in legal game-playing of a sexual nature at 275 dollars an hour for a 90 minute session, the Washington Post reported.

But Palfrey has also hinted that she has a record of the phone numbers of thousands of more than 10,000 customers that could embarrass more the a few of the US capital’s high-fliers.

Friday, the US State Department announced that Randall Tobias, the embattled head of the US Agency for International Development (USAID), was resigning for unspecified personal reasons.

However ABC News, which said Palfrey has provided it with a record of the numbers of calls to her private cell phone, reported that Tobias stepped down after they spoke to him about his allegedly contacting her number.

Tobias since 2003 also was President George W. Bush’s first global AIDS coordinator, a job which drew criticism for his emphasis on faithfulness to partners and abstinence over condom use in trying to prevent the spread of the AIDS virus.

Before entering government he was chairman, president and chief executive of the pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly, and also, from 1997-2000, chairman of the board of trustees at Duke University.

His now-reported links to a firm accused of prostitution have raised more than a few eyebrows.

Palfrey’s California home and other assets were seized by US tax authorities in October, and Palfrey has been trying to raise funds for her defense through an appeal on her website.

Her lawyer, Montgomery Blair Sibley, told Fox television last month: “The statistical certainty (is) that there are a fair number of high-profile people who used this service across the government and private sector in the metropolitan DC area.”

And the Post reported Saturday that local jitters appear to be multiplying. It said Sibley claimed that “he has been contacted in the past few days has been contacted by five lawyers asking whether their clients’ phone numbers are on Palfrey’s list of 10,000 to 15,000 customers from 2002 to 2006.”

That may have something to do with the fact that Palfrey already has named her first name, as it were, on her website, where she has posted a court document from April 12 in which she alleges formal US naval commander Harlan Ullman was a “regular customer” whom she needs to subpoena.

With James Wade, Ullman developed the military doctrine of “shock and awe” used by US government in its invasion of Iraq. According to one definition, it is shorthand for rapid dominance based on the use of “overwhelming decisive force,” “dominant maneuvers,” and “spectacular displays of power” to subdue the other side.

Earlier this month Ullman told CNN that “The allegations do not dignify a response,” and referred any other questions to his lawyer.

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