Frontier Former Editor

March 26, 2011

And then we’ll order some traps from the Acme Corporation . . .

Carlos Lam – the new Alfred Naujocks?

Not to be confused with Robert Lam of Chicago Transit Authority

Carlos Lam, plotter not-so-extraordinaire

  Mr Lam – until Friday, a deputy prosecutor for Johnson County, Indiana but still presumably an admirer of whiteshirt Republican Governor Scott Walker of  Wisconsin – apparently thought that Nazi Germany came up with a few good ideas in the late summer of 1939. Like using deception and staged violence to defame enemies domestic and foreign. Maybe Lam was surfing the web and found something really obscene, like the Gleiwitz incident.

'It'll be better than Arbitron, mein Fuhrer!'

Not-much-better plotter Alfred Naujocks

Lam, in what he probably thought was a fit of brilliance, committed his thoughts to email. An email with his username and part of the official email system of the Johnson County, Indiana prosecutor’s office.

And, thus, the official records of that system begat this:

“If you could employ an associate who pretends to be sympathetic to the unions’ cause to physically attack you (or even use a firearm against you), you could discredit the unions,” the email said.

“Currently, the media is painting the union protest as a democratic uprising and failing to mention the role of the DNC and umbrella union organizations in the protest. Employing a false flag operation would assist in undercutting any support that the media may be creating in favor of the unions. God bless, Carlos F. Lam.”

Let’s see . . . in 1939, SS-Obergruppenfuhrer Reinhard Heydrich, Gestapo chief Heinrich Mueller and SS Major Alfred Naujocks cooked up a similar plot in which concentration camp prisoners would be dressed in Polish uniforms and killed at the site of a German radio station to prove that the Poles were aggressors against the peace-loving German state.

I wonder if Lam deleted something from his email. Say, something like . . . . “Walker, mein leader, perhaps you could get some cheap clothing and weapons, requisition a few Wisconsin Department of Corrections inmates, make them change their clothes and let them ‘loose’ on the grounds of the governor’s chancellery . . . . your stadtpolizei would become heroes and collective bargaining for public employees could be reined in by a final resolution . . . .”

And for added interest, Mr. Lam seems to envision himself a prophet of race relations in the United States (here).

“This book is an excellent prediction of what is to come in the next century. Not only are black and hispanic militancy on the rise, but White movements are gaining adherents daily, probably in response to the crimes perpetrated against Whites by these other races. Mr. Chittum’s predictions are also backed up with statistics, and he also shows that past multiethnic empires have broken up. Read it and prepare.”

I feel so inadequate. My best effort on Amazon’s book reviews was only this.

I suppose it could have been worse. Lam could have gotten a copy of ‘The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.’

But all of this still leaves a question unanswered. What passes for brains among some segments of the GOP in the north central U.S.? I have one theory . . . .

Well, it is brain matter . . .

The synapses are probably more active in this too . . .

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March 15, 2009

Cry me a river, you neo-fascist turd

Dick Cheney is aggrieved because Dubya didn’t pardon his familiar:

“I was clearly not happy that we, in effect, left Scooter sort of hanging in the wind,” Cheney said in an interview on CNN’s “State of the Union with John King.” He acknowledged a “fundamental difference of opinion” with Bush on the matter.

A federal jury in Washington convicted Libby of lying and obstructing an investigation into who blew the cover of CIA officer Valerie Plame, whose husband, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson, had criticized the Iraq war.

Bush earlier commuted Libby’s 2-1/2-year prison sentence but before leaving office in January, Bush refused to give Libby an outright pardon.

Cheney said Libby had been unjustly accused and deserved a pardon but Bush disagreed. It was one of the few areas that Cheney has publicly said he disagreed with Bush on during their eight years in the White House.

I’ve made my opinion of Dick Cheney clear in this blog many a time – from his term as Secretary of Defense to the last eight years of a neo-fascist pall over this country. But now, I truly think he is this country’s Beria or Feliks Dzerzhinskiy, or even a low-rent Himmler.

Please, Cheney, find yourself a lair with some self-destructive mountain militia.

February 5, 2008

The banality of evil

This is pretty much how I’ve imagined conversations in the Oval Office, the Justice department and the Naval Observatory the last seven and a half years

October 28, 2007

I suppose it is easy to get pissed . . .

when the kids are behaving exactly like the parents. Not that it really surprises me, but it does have its own chuckle factor:

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D8SI15C80&show_article=1

WASHINGTON (AP) – The homeland security chief on Saturday tore into his own employees for staging a phony news conference at the Federal Emergency Management Agency. “I think it was one of the dumbest and most inappropriate things I’ve seen since I’ve been in government,” Michael Chertoff said.“I have made unambiguously clear, in Anglo-Saxon prose, that it is not to ever happen again and there will be appropriate disciplinary action taken against those people who exhibited what I regard as extraordinarily poor judgment,” he added.”

Anglo-Saxon prose, eh? Fuck you Chertoff, you shitbag fuckwit goddamn Bush administration mouthpiece and douchebag. How’s that for unambiguously clear, Anglo-Saxon prose?

It doesn’t strike me as the dumbest and most inappropriate thing I’ve ever seen in government. After all, there’s:

  • – the actual FEMA and Homeland Security response to Hurricane Katrina
  • – the invasion of Iraq (and yes, it was an invasion)
  • – George W. Bush in general
  • – damn near anything Dick Cheney does on a daily basis, whether or not it’s classified.
  • – all those canned news spots issued by a private PR firm under a contract by the federal government on the Medicare drug benefit plan – the one with the fake reporter.

It just goes to show the real point Orwell made in 1984: totalianism in the future is the result of basically stupid, ignorant, know-nothing people that we allow to ooze into positions of responsibility.

September 23, 2007

I agree wholeheartedly . . . .

with Stiletto on this one:

By JENNIFER LOVEN, Associated Press Writer Sat Sep 22, 1:59 PM ET

WASHINGTON – President Bush again called Democrats “irresponsible” on Saturday for pushing an expansion he opposes to a children’s health insurance program.

“Democrats in Congress have decided to pass a bill they know will be vetoed,” Bush said of the measure that draws significant bipartisan support, repeating in his weekly radio address an accusation he made earlier in the week. “Members of Congress are risking health coverage for poor children purely to make a political point.”

In the Democrat’s response, also broadcast Saturday, Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell turned the tables on the president, saying that if Bush doesn’t sign the bill, 15 states will have no funding left for the program by the end of the month . . . . more

(more…)

August 27, 2007

What’s one attorney general forced from office in disgrace?

Too goddamned late and not enough.

But, hey, you take what you can get.

So, without further ado,  the annotated news guide to Alberto “Heirich Himmler” Gonzales (and a not-very-smart Himmler wannabe at that) . . . .

By MATT APUZZO, Associated Press Writer 7 minutes ago

WASHINGTON – Alberto Gonzales, the nation’s first Hispanic attorney general (and a much bigger-haired version of Heinrich Himmler, Harry Daugherty and John Mitchell), announced his resignation Monday, driven from office after a wrenching standoff with congressional critics over his honesty and competence (there was no standoff over his honesty and competence – everyone knew that he was a dissembling, unethical, gutless mouthpiece with an anus big enough to have Karl Rove’s and Dick Cheney’s hands inserted to operate his eyes, head and mouth).

Republicans and Democrats alike had demanded his departure over the botched handling of FBI terror investigations and the firings of U.S. attorneys, but President Bush had defiantly stood by his Texas friend (and clinically-defined toady) for months until accepting his resignation last Friday.

(more…)

July 3, 2007

It doesn’t surprise me, but it certainly disgusts me . . .

most of all because that fat, bald, arrhytmic neofascist Cheney got away with the real crime. 

Statement by the President On Executive Clemency for Lewis Libby

The United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit today rejected Lewis Libby’s request to remain free on bail while pursuing his appeals for the serious convictions of perjury and obstruction of justice. As a result, Mr. Libby will be required to turn himself over to the Bureau of Prisons to begin serving his prison sentence.

I have said throughout this process that it would not be appropriate to comment or intervene in this case until Mr. Libby’s appeals have been exhausted. But with the denial of bail being upheld and incarceration imminent, I believe it is now important to react to that decision.

From the very beginning of the investigation into the leaking of Valerie Plame’s name, I made it clear to the White House staff and anyone serving in my administration that I expected full cooperation with the Justice Department. Dozens of White House staff and administration officials dutifully cooperated.

After the investigation was under way, the Justice Department appointed United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois Patrick Fitzgerald as a Special Counsel in charge of the case. Mr. Fitzgerald is a highly qualified, professional prosecutor who carried out his responsibilities as charged.

This case has generated significant commentary and debate. Critics of the investigation have argued that a special counsel should not have been appointed, nor should the investigation have been pursued after the Justice Department learned who leaked Ms. Plame’s name to columnist Robert Novak. Furthermore, the critics point out that neither Mr. Libby nor anyone else has been charged with violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act or the Espionage Act, which were the original subjects of the investigation. Finally, critics say the punishment does not fit the crime: Mr. Libby was a first-time offender with years of exceptional public service and was handed a harsh sentence based in part on allegations never presented to the jury.

Others point out that a jury of citizens weighed all the evidence and listened to all the testimony and found Mr. Libby guilty of perjury and obstructing justice. They argue, correctly, that our entire system of justice relies on people telling the truth. And if a person does not tell the truth, particularly if he serves in government and holds the public trust, he must be held accountable. They say that had Mr. Libby only told the truth, he would have never been indicted in the first place.

Both critics and defenders of this investigation have made important points. I have made my own evaluation. In preparing for the decision I am announcing today, I have carefully weighed these arguments and the circumstances surrounding this case.

Mr. Libby was sentenced to thirty months of prison, two years of probation, and a $250,000 fine. In making the sentencing decision, the district court rejected the advice of the probation office, which recommended a lesser sentence and the consideration of factors that could have led to a sentence of home confinement or probation.

I respect the jury’s verdict. But I have concluded that the prison sentence given to Mr. Libby is excessive. Therefore, I am commuting the portion of Mr. Libby’s sentence that required him to spend thirty months in prison.

My decision to commute his prison sentence leaves in place a harsh punishment for Mr. Libby. The reputation he gained through his years of public service and professional work in the legal community is forever damaged. His wife and young children have also suffered immensely. He will remain on probation. The significant fines imposed by the judge will remain in effect. The consequences of his felony conviction on his former life as a lawyer, public servant, and private citizen will be long-lasting.

The Constitution gives the President the power of clemency to be used when he deems it to be warranted. It is my judgment that a commutation of the prison term in Mr. Libby’s case is an appropriate exercise of this power.

from the White House  

July 1, 2007

Selective nostalgia

I particularly relish this piece because my independent study course as a history major covered Chamberlain’s actions in 1938-40 . . . .

Why Winston Wouldn’t Stand For W
George W. Bush always wanted to be like a wartime British prime ministers. He is. But it’s not the one he had in mind.

By Lynne Olson
Sunday, July 1, 2007; B01

President Bush‘s favorite role model is, famously, Jesus, but Winston Churchill is close behind. The president admires the wartime British prime minister so much that he keeps what he calls “a stern-looking bust” of Churchill in the Oval Office. “He watches my every move,” Bush jokes. These days, Churchill would probably not care for much of what he sees . . .

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/29/AR2007062902304_pf.html

June 26, 2007

If I were the Bundeswehr (besides having to eat for several hundred thousand . . . )

Filed under: cinema, Is he tall enough to reach the table?, mad bombers, neofascism, Scientology, Third Reich — Frontier Former Editor @ 10:29 am

I’d tell Tom Cruise, “Sure, you can film at our facilities, as long as you do some real method acting . . . like losing the arm and the eye and a few fingers . . . for real.”

http://movies.yahoo.com/mv/news/va/20070625/118279999700.html

June 17, 2007

Another reason why most of the Bush administration and more than a few generals should be hunted down and tried as violent, stupid criminals . . .

Seymour Hersh does it again, and his source material is pretty damned hard to refute.

I know deep down what happened before I read it because it’s typical institutional behavior, but it still disgusts and revolts me to hear it.

The General’s Report

How Antonio Taguba, who investigated the Abu Ghraib scandal, became one of its casualties.

by Seymour M. Hersh

“Here . . . comes . . . that famous General Taguba—of the Taguba report!” Rumsfeld declared, in a mocking voice. The meeting was attended by Paul Wolfowitz, Rumsfeld’s deputy; Stephen Cambone, the Under-Secretary of Defense for Intelligence; General Richard Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (J.C.S.); and General Peter Schoomaker, the Army chief of staff, along with Craddock and other officials. Taguba, describing the moment nearly three years later, said, sadly, “I thought they wanted to know. I assumed they wanted to know. I was ignorant of the setting.”

more . . . .

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