Frontier Former Editor

March 26, 2011

And then we’ll order some traps from the Acme Corporation . . .

Carlos Lam – the new Alfred Naujocks?

Not to be confused with Robert Lam of Chicago Transit Authority

Carlos Lam, plotter not-so-extraordinaire

  Mr Lam – until Friday, a deputy prosecutor for Johnson County, Indiana but still presumably an admirer of whiteshirt Republican Governor Scott Walker of  Wisconsin – apparently thought that Nazi Germany came up with a few good ideas in the late summer of 1939. Like using deception and staged violence to defame enemies domestic and foreign. Maybe Lam was surfing the web and found something really obscene, like the Gleiwitz incident.

'It'll be better than Arbitron, mein Fuhrer!'

Not-much-better plotter Alfred Naujocks

Lam, in what he probably thought was a fit of brilliance, committed his thoughts to email. An email with his username and part of the official email system of the Johnson County, Indiana prosecutor’s office.

And, thus, the official records of that system begat this:

“If you could employ an associate who pretends to be sympathetic to the unions’ cause to physically attack you (or even use a firearm against you), you could discredit the unions,” the email said.

“Currently, the media is painting the union protest as a democratic uprising and failing to mention the role of the DNC and umbrella union organizations in the protest. Employing a false flag operation would assist in undercutting any support that the media may be creating in favor of the unions. God bless, Carlos F. Lam.”

Let’s see . . . in 1939, SS-Obergruppenfuhrer Reinhard Heydrich, Gestapo chief Heinrich Mueller and SS Major Alfred Naujocks cooked up a similar plot in which concentration camp prisoners would be dressed in Polish uniforms and killed at the site of a German radio station to prove that the Poles were aggressors against the peace-loving German state.

I wonder if Lam deleted something from his email. Say, something like . . . . “Walker, mein leader, perhaps you could get some cheap clothing and weapons, requisition a few Wisconsin Department of Corrections inmates, make them change their clothes and let them ‘loose’ on the grounds of the governor’s chancellery . . . . your stadtpolizei would become heroes and collective bargaining for public employees could be reined in by a final resolution . . . .”

And for added interest, Mr. Lam seems to envision himself a prophet of race relations in the United States (here).

“This book is an excellent prediction of what is to come in the next century. Not only are black and hispanic militancy on the rise, but White movements are gaining adherents daily, probably in response to the crimes perpetrated against Whites by these other races. Mr. Chittum’s predictions are also backed up with statistics, and he also shows that past multiethnic empires have broken up. Read it and prepare.”

I feel so inadequate. My best effort on Amazon’s book reviews was only this.

I suppose it could have been worse. Lam could have gotten a copy of ‘The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.’

But all of this still leaves a question unanswered. What passes for brains among some segments of the GOP in the north central U.S.? I have one theory . . . .

Well, it is brain matter . . .

The synapses are probably more active in this too . . .

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March 17, 2009

Here’s another reason to major in history, or at least read it more than once every few years . . .

The Credit Mobilier scandal of 1872 – a good reason to hold big business’ s and elected government’s collective feet to the fire on a regular basis.

“Crédit Mobilier of America was formed by George Francis Train, the vice-president in charge of publicity for the Union Pacific Railroad. Crédit Mobilier of America was designed to limit the liability of stockholders and maximize profits from construction with the hefty fees being paid by federal subsidies. The company also gave cheap shares of stock to members of Congress who agreed to support additional funding  . . .

“It was claimed that the $72 million in contracts had been given to Crédit Mobilier for building a rail only worth $53 million. Union Pacific and other investors were left nearly bankrupt.”

Okay folks, and that was 57 years before the 1929 crash. Dubya, let’s go over the success of the “No Child Left Behind Act” again, shall we?

March 15, 2009

Cry me a river, you neo-fascist turd

Dick Cheney is aggrieved because Dubya didn’t pardon his familiar:

“I was clearly not happy that we, in effect, left Scooter sort of hanging in the wind,” Cheney said in an interview on CNN’s “State of the Union with John King.” He acknowledged a “fundamental difference of opinion” with Bush on the matter.

A federal jury in Washington convicted Libby of lying and obstructing an investigation into who blew the cover of CIA officer Valerie Plame, whose husband, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson, had criticized the Iraq war.

Bush earlier commuted Libby’s 2-1/2-year prison sentence but before leaving office in January, Bush refused to give Libby an outright pardon.

Cheney said Libby had been unjustly accused and deserved a pardon but Bush disagreed. It was one of the few areas that Cheney has publicly said he disagreed with Bush on during their eight years in the White House.

I’ve made my opinion of Dick Cheney clear in this blog many a time – from his term as Secretary of Defense to the last eight years of a neo-fascist pall over this country. But now, I truly think he is this country’s Beria or Feliks Dzerzhinskiy, or even a low-rent Himmler.

Please, Cheney, find yourself a lair with some self-destructive mountain militia.

October 18, 2008

Getting it out of my system

Okay, so I used my lunch hour to walk over to the airport.

But that’s it. A Nikon D 40 or 50 is on my to-do list.

And a telephoto lens . . .

And even if the paint job is spurious, it looks good . . .

And sometimes classic is just the best.

Havea good weekend. I did.

October 17, 2008

Guess what I got to do before work?

I miss living near air bases and I miss my old line of work. It gave me reasons to get out of the office and do this under the guise of reporting:

I could give you the pedantic planespottter spiel, but I’ll leave it to these folks . . .

It helps when the airport manager remembers what you’ve done before and gives you only one warning.

“Don’t walk near anything moving or sucking.”

Might have been good advice for Bill Clinton.

September 11, 2008

Seven years after . . .

Filed under: 2001, Afghanistan, colonialism, doomed to repeat, God, history, old times, politics, scumbags, Sept. 11, support our troops — Tags: , , — Frontier Former Editor @ 9:04 am

The television and radio are full of remembrances today. You’ll probably see no shortage of Sept. 11-themed photos on the web today, and public figures will make no end of references to what happened seven years ago.

I, like so many others, mourn the dead. But I also mourn that a nation has such a short-term memory and an unwillingness to understand more than the sight of a burning building.

Yes, we should well have invaded Afghanistan. We had a moral obligation to go in there and clean the place out like the rat-infested barn that it was.

After all, we created the rats. We funded and armed the groups that became the Taliban and al Qaida because we wanted to give the then Soviet Union the same kind of headaches and heartburn that we suffered in Vietnam. And after they helped send the Red Army home, they felt they had the same sort of license to begin oppressing their own. Eventually, they did what any well-conditioned Doberman would do – turn on those who fed and raised it.

We owed the world a cold, focused rage to go clean up a mess we had created two decades earlier.

And we botched it. We failed to give the troops who went there adequate numbers and materiel. We failed to maintain the focus on our responsibility, which allowed so many other countries to jump on a bandwagon of revanche against other groups and nations. We failed to tell other countries to stay out of our way in one small corner of earth.

And we failed to remember why we were doing it. We let evangelical and neo-colonialforces in our society twist and mutate it into an old-fashioned capital-C Crusade in which we were leading the world into broad, sunlit pastures. We failed to remember that we were, in fact, going back to clean up a nasty, brutal mess that we let fester and mold and spread.

And then we as a nation allowed a small group of people with visions of an American empire of resources twist the vision of a ‘war on terror’ into an excuse to go into Iraq. Forget all those who still say that there was evidence that Iraq wanted to sow terror in the U.S. After seven years, any semblance of connected, systematic evidence of such an Iraqi effort simply isn’t there.

And after five years of what is – and yes, it really is if you study the history – another damn Vietnam, we’re finally realizing that we lost sight of what we were supposed to do in Afghanistan. Except that, unlike Vietnam, we may very well have destabilized the region we were trying to uplift and control.

We have allowed our government to misuse our armed forces, stretch them thin, and then ask them to go back and do what we didn’t allow them to do – scrub Afghanistan with a wire brush. Assuming, of course, that we would have any better luck than Afghanistan’s previous occupiers.

Seven years after, the memory of all those dead people in New York and northern Virginia and Pennsylvania has been besmirched because we allowed a third-rate political scion and his Nixon-era handlers to corrupt an opportunity to make good on one of many errors of judgement.

The next time you hear someone say that we’re on a mission from God, please, please demand that they show a receipt or a work order or a certified letter from God. If they can’t, tell them to go to hell.

August 3, 2008

Russian first . . .

Filed under: history, Russia — Tags: , — Frontier Former Editor @ 11:46 pm

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn died Sunday. He came to the U.S. when I was 12, returned to Russia when  I was 32, and bewildered just about every American who thought he was an enemy of Communism.

Yes, he was an enemy of Communism but that didn’t keep him from being a Russian first and foremost.

From the International Herald Tribune:

“In an interview last year with Der Spiegel, Solzhenitsyn said that Russians’ view of the West as a “knight of democracy” had been shattered by the NATO bombing of Serbia, an event he called “a grave disillusion, a crushing of ideals.” He dismissed Western democracy-building efforts, telling the Times of London in 2005 that democracy “is not worth a brass farthing if it is installed by bayonet.”

“In 2007, he accepted a State Prize from then-President Putin — after refusing, on principle, similar prizes from Gorbachev and from Yeltsin. Putin, he said in the Der Spiegel interview, “inherited a ransacked and bewildered country, with a poor and demoralized people. And he started to do what was possible — a slow and gradual restoration.” ”

Make of it what you will.

May 8, 2008

Sliding scale of public indignation . . .

Filed under: bald white guys, Bush, doomed to repeat, Dubya, history, old times, semi humor — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Frontier Former Editor @ 9:55 pm

or, I’m feeling rather derivative today.

First, to get warmed up for all of this, go read the post and thread over at Max’s blog. It’ll warm your heart if you’re over 40 and give you a valuable cultural lesson if you’re under 40.

Second, go to Raincoaster, get a dish of calamari, and read up on some of the hijinks (a and b) of my favorite Russian carp/megalomaniac prince of Mother Russia.

 

Okay, now back to Kolchak.

One of the more delicious TV scandals of my youth was the hue and cry – especially in TV Guide – about “The Night Stalker” episode “Chopper.” All of that outcry that week in 1974 or 1975 was over a scene in which a head rolled – literally. You couldn’t really see that it was a head, just a blurry suggestion that someone was decapitated . It was as if the Hays Board came back to life and was ready to decree that married couples couldn’t appear on television in the same bed unless each spouse had a foot on the floor.

Three decades later, the FCC is levying fines for bare ass on the ABC network show ‘NYPD Blue’ – five years after the scene appeared on the air. If you’re particularly interested in the scene, go here (NSFW). It really won’t tell you much that you probably don’t already know about human anatomy.

 

Now for Prince Vlad.

Long before Putin, and a fair while before the KGB and the Soviet Union, there was an interesting Russian character – Pyotr Stolypin, a prime minister under Tsar Nicholas II. Stolypin, like Putin, had a clear vision of what he wanted Russia to become, and he executed that vision so well that he even had a fashionable piece of neckwear named after him: the Stolypin necktie. His necktie was usually displayed on large wooden racks on platforms with handy trapdoors.

Now, for the purposes of this post, I’m not passing judgement on Stolypin or Putin for their methods, but comparing their respective methods leaves a couple of conclusions. Putin is behaving exactly as one could expect a Russian to behave, and Bush and Cheney would make pisspoor Russians.

 

Tonight’s moral: if something makes you outraged or indignant, take a deep breath. It’s probably happened plenty of times before you were born and will probably happen several times more after you die.

May 5, 2008

If this is the stream of my conscious, then someone sue the Army Corps of Engineers

If the last two weeks haven’t been enough to make you want to test the Secret Service’s protection of presidential candidates, then you’ve broken through the tasteless store-bought pie crust of pop culture to find an incredible mince pie of such juicy morsels as:

– Austria, the only country stupid enough to elect a former SS officer as president and then ignore a well respected man about der stadt as he keeps a shadow family in the basement (the U.S. allows legions of scum to maintain secret chambers of horrors in their homes, but we’ve only managed to elect a wannabe fascist as vice president in the last couple of decades). If they would only use their powers for good – a good sachertorte.

– a presidential election whose attendance may very well have been eclipsed by the opening weekend of ‘Iron Man’ (and Robert Downey Jr.’s character flaws are so much more endearing and authentic than those of the current crop of presidential candidates). I’d much rather watch Downey shoot heroin, break in and fall asleep in a child’s bedroom, and then be sincerely contrite in court than I would watch Hillary down a boilermaker and claim to be one of the descamisados or watch Barack play another pick-up high school gym basketball game in that USMC sweatshirt or see McCain in whatever in hell express he’s named his tour bus these days.

– the U.S. oil industry, which continually amazes in its capacity to have butter melt in its collective mouth as it claims that its profits really aren’t profits.

– Paula Abdul’s ability to survive beyond 1990 as a celebrity. In retrospect, Toni Basil should have survived longer. My verdict: Abdul shouldn’t be allowed to teach dance classes for pre-teen pageants, let alone be on television for any reason.

– the American press’ development of enough backbone to ask Dubya why we should believe that Iraq is swinging our way after the past five years. Too goddamn bad they didn’t become vertebrates before the 2000 election.

– corn as the solution to our energy needs. It sounds like an episode of ‘Green Acres’ with Mr Haney, Eb and Hank Kimball as the weird sisters around the silver-soldered copper still as Arnold Ziffel stokes the fire and Lisa makes pancakes.

– I’d question Tom Cruise, but short crazy men have already made their impact on world history at least twice in the 20th century. Are you listening, Adolf and ‘L’il Kim’?

I’ve decided that I’m going to let this election happen in whatever mutated form it takes. I’ll vote, if only because it gives me the moral right to bitch long and hard about the result, but it looks like “The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” will be next year’s beach read.

April 29, 2008

If Roger Ailes had any sense of decency about him . . .

he’d have the cast of “Fox and Friends” summarily executed for terminal stupidity.

Apparently, according to Dan Abrams over at MSNBC, the Fox morning crew apparently babbled on about the Lincoln-Douglas debate in the wake of Hillary and Barack contemplating their own L-D style event. The backdrop to the Fox analysis? Side-by-side photos of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

Let me make it easy and in terms culturally relevant to the numbnuts masquerading as morning show hosts at Fox. The Lincoln-Douglas debate involved two white men – one tall and one short, like this . . . .

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