Frontier Former Editor

February 26, 2009

Thank you Rain for boosting my self esteem!

To Rain:

As Sly Stone would say in a situation like this, “I want to thank you/for letting me/be myself’/again!”

Congratulations, you’re rabies!

Transmitted by rabid animals, you’re most commonly found infecting creatures such as raccoons, skunks, bats and foxes. But don’t worry, you affect humans too, causing either paralysis or hyperactivity in your advanced stages, and ultimately death.

Your most famous symptom is hypersalviation – that delightful foaming at the mouth that we have come to know and indeed love. However, you can also cause hallucination; think of the fun you could have at parties!

If you wish, you can proudly tell the world that you kill dogs . . .

 

I am Rabies. Grrrrrrrr!
Which Horrible Affliction are you?
A Rum and Monkey disease.

February 22, 2009

Army strong-arm?

Having grown up as a military dependent and now working in a profession where I see how the economy is wreaking havoc on soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guarsdmen, I’ve always been a firm believer in giving military personnel and their families needed aid and comfort. Consistently, they face one of the crappiest professional and home enviroments found in American society, and we ask them to do it at a mere pittance while bankers, entertainers and sports figures drain wealth far in excess of their usefulness to society.

I’ve seen how that aid and comfort has been provided over the years, from service relief organizations to the firm yet fatherly guidance of a senior NCO  for a wayward soldier or sailor. But this bit of news is something that our new National Command Authority might want to consider tending to in short order:

Between 2003 and 2007 — as many military families dealt with long war deployments and increased numbers of home foreclosures — Army Emergency Relief grew into a $345 million behemoth. During those years, the charity packed away $117 million into its own reserves while spending just $64 million on direct aid, according to an AP analysis of its tax records.

Tax-exempt and legally separate from the military, AER projects a facade of independence but really operates under close Army control. The massive nonprofit — funded predominantly by troops — allows superiors to squeeze soldiers for contributions; forces struggling soldiers to repay loans — sometimes delaying transfers and promotions; and too often violates its own rules by rewarding donors, such as giving free passes from physical training, the AP found.

Granted, you can’t run a military like it was a democracy. But a democracy certainly can impose some core values conducive to discipline, good order and humaneness toward the troops.

December 12, 2008

RIP, Bettie Page

Filed under: anatomy, art, art or something like it, be all you can be — Tags: — Frontier Former Editor @ 4:21 pm

Here.

A shame, given the kinds of people who do survive in public life these days

October 7, 2007

And if you really support the troops . . .

stop spending money on those tacky-assed magnetic yellow or red-white-and-blue “Support Our Troops” ribbons and start riding the collective ass of your elected officials from legislators on up to the f*ckwit masquerading as Commander-in-Chief.

Latest example (courtesy of WCSH, Portland, Maine, ayuh):

National Guard Troops Denied Benefits After Longest Deployment Of Iraq War

MINNEAPOLIS, MN (NBC) — When they came home from Iraq, 2,600 members of the Minnesota National Guard had been deployed longer than any other ground combat unit. The tour lasted 22 months and had been extended as part of President Bush’s surge.

1st Lt. Jon Anderson said he never expected to come home to this: A government refusing to pay education benefits he says he should have earned under the GI bill.

“It’s pretty much a slap in the face,” Anderson said. “I think it was a scheme to save money, personally. I think it was a leadership failure by the senior Washington leadership… once again failing the soldiers.”

Anderson’s orders, and the orders of 1,161 other Minnesota guard members, were written for 729 days.

Had they been written for 730 days, just one day more, the soldiers would receive those benefits to pay for school.”

And, fittingly enough, inset into the above article was this . . . .

  • Enlist In The U.S. Army

    Enlistment bonuses of up to $40,000 100% college tuition reimbursement.

    officialarmy.com

  • I am so goddamned tired of my government.

    August 28, 2007

    And in a shameless ripoff from Laurie Kendrick . . .

    whose toy post induced a flashback to the days of the Sears Wishbook, I give you my favorite childhood toy . . . .

                                johnnyseven.jpg

    The Johnny Seven!

    Yes, a seven-function pistol/battle rifle/grenade launcher/anti-tank rocket/heavy machine gun/rocket grenade/heavy rocket launcher! And with extra-dense plastic bullets that could leave your neighborhood rival for influence looking like he’d had 20 TB tests before dinner.

     Apparently my folks were able to get an export certificate for mine, because I brought it back from England and still was able to terrorize a moderate-size ville with relative ease.

    Now go to Laurie’s place for some less warlike toys, while I go pacify some local sectarian violence . . . .

    August 27, 2007

    What’s one attorney general forced from office in disgrace?

    Too goddamned late and not enough.

    But, hey, you take what you can get.

    So, without further ado,  the annotated news guide to Alberto “Heirich Himmler” Gonzales (and a not-very-smart Himmler wannabe at that) . . . .

    By MATT APUZZO, Associated Press Writer 7 minutes ago

    WASHINGTON – Alberto Gonzales, the nation’s first Hispanic attorney general (and a much bigger-haired version of Heinrich Himmler, Harry Daugherty and John Mitchell), announced his resignation Monday, driven from office after a wrenching standoff with congressional critics over his honesty and competence (there was no standoff over his honesty and competence – everyone knew that he was a dissembling, unethical, gutless mouthpiece with an anus big enough to have Karl Rove’s and Dick Cheney’s hands inserted to operate his eyes, head and mouth).

    Republicans and Democrats alike had demanded his departure over the botched handling of FBI terror investigations and the firings of U.S. attorneys, but President Bush had defiantly stood by his Texas friend (and clinically-defined toady) for months until accepting his resignation last Friday.

    (more…)

    July 8, 2007

    Note to Department of Defense – don’t outsource PR either

    Filed under: be all you can be, dumbasses, free govt. stuff, helicopters, public relations — Frontier Former Editor @ 9:09 pm

    As if the U.S. Army doesn’t have enough public relations issues these days, I bring you the following snippet of a recent Army pop-up ad:

    index_01.jpg

    The helicopter hovering in the left of this banner – an Aerospatiale Gazelle – is not even in the U.S. Army’s front-line or support inventory unless there’s a test/evaluation example tucked away somewhere.

    Unless, of course, someone at the Pentagon or at Halliburton surreptitiously switched the Army’s helicopter inventory with that of the French Army . . . .

    July 3, 2007

    It doesn’t surprise me, but it certainly disgusts me . . .

    most of all because that fat, bald, arrhytmic neofascist Cheney got away with the real crime. 

    Statement by the President On Executive Clemency for Lewis Libby

    The United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit today rejected Lewis Libby’s request to remain free on bail while pursuing his appeals for the serious convictions of perjury and obstruction of justice. As a result, Mr. Libby will be required to turn himself over to the Bureau of Prisons to begin serving his prison sentence.

    I have said throughout this process that it would not be appropriate to comment or intervene in this case until Mr. Libby’s appeals have been exhausted. But with the denial of bail being upheld and incarceration imminent, I believe it is now important to react to that decision.

    From the very beginning of the investigation into the leaking of Valerie Plame’s name, I made it clear to the White House staff and anyone serving in my administration that I expected full cooperation with the Justice Department. Dozens of White House staff and administration officials dutifully cooperated.

    After the investigation was under way, the Justice Department appointed United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois Patrick Fitzgerald as a Special Counsel in charge of the case. Mr. Fitzgerald is a highly qualified, professional prosecutor who carried out his responsibilities as charged.

    This case has generated significant commentary and debate. Critics of the investigation have argued that a special counsel should not have been appointed, nor should the investigation have been pursued after the Justice Department learned who leaked Ms. Plame’s name to columnist Robert Novak. Furthermore, the critics point out that neither Mr. Libby nor anyone else has been charged with violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act or the Espionage Act, which were the original subjects of the investigation. Finally, critics say the punishment does not fit the crime: Mr. Libby was a first-time offender with years of exceptional public service and was handed a harsh sentence based in part on allegations never presented to the jury.

    Others point out that a jury of citizens weighed all the evidence and listened to all the testimony and found Mr. Libby guilty of perjury and obstructing justice. They argue, correctly, that our entire system of justice relies on people telling the truth. And if a person does not tell the truth, particularly if he serves in government and holds the public trust, he must be held accountable. They say that had Mr. Libby only told the truth, he would have never been indicted in the first place.

    Both critics and defenders of this investigation have made important points. I have made my own evaluation. In preparing for the decision I am announcing today, I have carefully weighed these arguments and the circumstances surrounding this case.

    Mr. Libby was sentenced to thirty months of prison, two years of probation, and a $250,000 fine. In making the sentencing decision, the district court rejected the advice of the probation office, which recommended a lesser sentence and the consideration of factors that could have led to a sentence of home confinement or probation.

    I respect the jury’s verdict. But I have concluded that the prison sentence given to Mr. Libby is excessive. Therefore, I am commuting the portion of Mr. Libby’s sentence that required him to spend thirty months in prison.

    My decision to commute his prison sentence leaves in place a harsh punishment for Mr. Libby. The reputation he gained through his years of public service and professional work in the legal community is forever damaged. His wife and young children have also suffered immensely. He will remain on probation. The significant fines imposed by the judge will remain in effect. The consequences of his felony conviction on his former life as a lawyer, public servant, and private citizen will be long-lasting.

    The Constitution gives the President the power of clemency to be used when he deems it to be warranted. It is my judgment that a commutation of the prison term in Mr. Libby’s case is an appropriate exercise of this power.

    from the White House  

    July 1, 2007

    Selective nostalgia

    I particularly relish this piece because my independent study course as a history major covered Chamberlain’s actions in 1938-40 . . . .

    Why Winston Wouldn’t Stand For W
    George W. Bush always wanted to be like a wartime British prime ministers. He is. But it’s not the one he had in mind.

    By Lynne Olson
    Sunday, July 1, 2007; B01

    President Bush‘s favorite role model is, famously, Jesus, but Winston Churchill is close behind. The president admires the wartime British prime minister so much that he keeps what he calls “a stern-looking bust” of Churchill in the Oval Office. “He watches my every move,” Bush jokes. These days, Churchill would probably not care for much of what he sees . . .

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/29/AR2007062902304_pf.html

    June 17, 2007

    Another reason why most of the Bush administration and more than a few generals should be hunted down and tried as violent, stupid criminals . . .

    Seymour Hersh does it again, and his source material is pretty damned hard to refute.

    I know deep down what happened before I read it because it’s typical institutional behavior, but it still disgusts and revolts me to hear it.

    The General’s Report

    How Antonio Taguba, who investigated the Abu Ghraib scandal, became one of its casualties.

    by Seymour M. Hersh

    “Here . . . comes . . . that famous General Taguba—of the Taguba report!” Rumsfeld declared, in a mocking voice. The meeting was attended by Paul Wolfowitz, Rumsfeld’s deputy; Stephen Cambone, the Under-Secretary of Defense for Intelligence; General Richard Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (J.C.S.); and General Peter Schoomaker, the Army chief of staff, along with Craddock and other officials. Taguba, describing the moment nearly three years later, said, sadly, “I thought they wanted to know. I assumed they wanted to know. I was ignorant of the setting.”

    more . . . .

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